Artworks that add color to life

A collection of artworks that illuminate The Capitol Hotel Tokyu

The Capitol Hotel Tokyu has many artworks which have been inherited from the old hotel, along with its architectural design.
Here are some of the artworks displayed in the hotel.


 

Tokyo designed by Kengo Kuma

Designed by world-renowned architect Kengo Kuma, the architect behind the National Stadium for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. The design of the Tokyu Capitol Tower embodies Japanese sensibility, a subtle blend of distinctive Japanese architecture inherited from the former hotel and modern style. One of the most distinctive features is the 3F main lobby, “Tokyo”, inspired by the wooden structure roof of a traditional Japanese shrine. The building is designed to welcome guests warmly, without the intimidating feeling of high-rise buildings, sharing a space with the 500-year old Hie Shrine.
[3F Main Lobby]

 

Hotel Exterior by Kengo Kuma

Designed by world-renowned architect Kengo Kuma, the architect behind the National Stadium for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. An expressive appearance that echoes the changes in the environment using a delicate braided lattice grid.

 

Banquet Entrance by Kengo Kuma

Designed by Kengo Kuma, a leading architect in Japan responsible for the design of the National Stadium at the Tokyo Olympics 2020. Overlapping of extruded aluminum overlaid with a cedar pattern creates a sense of depth.
[1F Banquet Entrance]

 

Main Entrance by Kengo Kuma

Designed by world-renowned architect Kengo Kuma, who is also the architect behind the National Stadium for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. The main entrance expresses the Japanese style of welcoming through its expansive eaves of natural wood and flows of water.

 

Fuji by Osamu Yokoyama

Showa Era Japanese painter, Osamu Yokoyama is recognized for breathing new style into post-war art. The linear manner of this piece displayed at the Misao Lounge at the old hotel provokes intensity and power. Currently, the piece welcomes guests to the banquet lobby of the hotel on the first floor.
[1F Banquet Lobby]

 

Sogetsu Ryu Ikebana

Sogetsu Ryu Ikebana is a contemporary art form of flower arranging based on Japanese traditions, without being bound by limits and boundaries in shape and form. The main lobby is adorned with different displays each month for guests to embrace the changes in seasons at The Capitol Hotel Tokyu.
[3F Hotel Main Entrance]

 

Yanagi Green Flower Red Bowl by Shiko Munakata

A renowned woodblock printmaker who describes his own woodblock prints as "paintings that emerged from inside wood plates”. This piece was published in 1955 and exhibited at the 28th Venice Biennale in Italy the following year, receiving the Grand Prix, International Print Award. From right to left, "January/February", "April/August", "October/September", "November/ December".
[3F (LF) Japanese cuisine, Suiren]

 

Memorial Wall "Golden Memory"

Pearl Ballroom in the old hotel, famous for hosting the Beatles press conference during their visit to Japan in 1966. The stage wall remains symbolic of their time at the hotel and has been recreated in front of the first floor banquet hall, welcoming guests with the memory of the greatest musicians of all time.
[1F in front of the Banquet Hall]

 

Pearl chandelier, an embodiment of the natural beauty of Japan.

The Pearl Ballroom in the old hotel displayed a stunning row of ten chandeliers made with three million pearls exuding brilliant rays of light. Some of the original pearls are retained in the newly redesigned chandelier which now hangs in Ho'oh banquet hall.
[1F Banquet Hall Ho'oh]

 

Mudai (Untitled) by Toko Shinoda

Work by Toko Shinoda, a leading female artist in Japan known for sumi ink paintings that blend traditional calligraphy with modern abstraction. In the old hotel, this work was displayed in the hotel's suite. It is said The Beatles, who came to Japan in 1966 and stayed at the hotel were impressed by the artwork so much that they purchased the paintbrush used in this piece.
[3F (LF) Reception, behind the sofa]

 

Yutaka by Toko Shinoda

A piece by Toko Shinoda, acclaimed Japanese artist of ink abstract. At age 97, Shinoda created this piece when the hotel was rebuilt. Displayed in contrast to "Mudai (Untitled)", the artwork speaks to the connectivity between the old and new hotels.
[3F (LF) Reception rear side]

 

Kiritsubo by Toko Shinoda

Toko Shinoda, a leading female artist in Japan known for sumi ink paintings that blend traditional calligraphy with modern abstraction. This piece suggests different impressions depending on the viewer. It is said to be a composition in which a female character appearing in the Tale of Genji hides her face with a fan. It was displayed at the Japanese restaurant, Genji, at the old Capitol Tokyu Hotel.
[3F (LF) Japanese cuisine, Suiren, Sushi Counter]

 

Iwato by Sofu Teshigahara

The work of Ikebana Sogetsu's founder, Sofu Teshigahara made of cedar wood, inlaid with aluminum and brass. Teshigahara left achievements in the world of Ikebana drawing out the freedom of expression, with any materials, never constrained by preconceptions. At the old hotel, it was displayed at the B2F banquet entrance.
[1F Banquet Lobby]

 

Iwaya by Sofu Teshigahara

The work of Sofu Teshigahara, founder of Ikebana Sogetsu, school of ikebana. Teshigahara left achievements in the world of Ikebana drawing out the freedom of expression, with any materials, never constrained by preconceptions. In the old hotel, it was displayed in the 1F main lobby.
[3F All Day Dining ORIGAMI]

 

Untitled by Sofu Teshigahara

The work of Sofu Teshigahara, founder of Ikebana Sogetsu, school of ikebana. Teshigahara left achievements in the world of Ikebana drawing out the freedom of expression, with any materials, never constrained by preconceptions. In the old hotel old, this work was displayed in the B3F arcade floor. [B2F Hotel Entrance]

 

Yadoya by Kitaoji Rosanjin

A signboard that is said to be a hand-carved work by the acclaimed Kitaoji Rosanjin, master artisan of Japanese cuisine. The small hill of Hie Shrine in which the hotel now stands was called Hoshigaoka from the ancient days, famous for its scenic view of the stars. On the site, Hoshigaoka Saryo, a members' only restaurants presided over by Rosanjin flourished from the end of the Taisho period to the beginning of the Showa era, as a place for many politicians and business leaders to interact. In the former hotel, this art piece was displayed in the main dining restaurant, Keyaki Grill.
[3F Japanese cuisine, Suiren]

 

Ten Ten Den by Hideho Takasu

Relief work by Hideho Takasu, incorporating the original design on a steel plate created by Isamu Kenmochi displayed at the old hotel's main dining restaurant, Keyaki Grill. The original motif is carved into the keyaki wood floorboard from the acclaimed restaurant, Hoshigaoka Saryo.
[3F All-day Dining ORIGAMI Wall]

 

La chute d'eau by Hiroko Hatakenaka

A work reborn as lacquer art using reclaimed keyaki wood from the floorboard of Hoshioka Saryo restaurant in the old hotel.
[29F The Capitol Suite Entrance]

 

Relief Work, Kana Characters by Hideho Takasu

Hideho Takasu uses keyaki wood reclaimed from the floor board of Hoshioka Saryo as material, to re-create kana character relief work found in artworks by calligrapher and craftsman, Honami Koetsu of Gotoh Museum.
[Guest Room Corridor]