Japan In Brief

Quick Reservation

Region

Comfort members

  • Membership Number

x close

 

x close

 

x close

 

Comfort members

  • Membership Number

Quick Reservation

Region

x close

 

x close

 

x close

 

Quick Reservation

Region

x close

 

x close

 

x close

 

East Garden of the Imperial Palace Imperial gardens free for all to enjoy.

East Garden of the Imperial Palace     Imperial gardens free for all to enjoy.

Spending time in parks may be the easiest and the cheapest way to enjoy the big city. As the capital city of Japan, Tokyo is home to countless big and beautiful gardens which act as the city’s lungs, creating a pleasant green divide between the high-rise modern buildings.

The Capitol Hotel Tokyu

Tokyo

2-10-3, Nagata-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0014 

  • Direct access to the Subway (Tameike-sanno Sta. / Kokkai-gijidomae Sta.) at B2 Floor, with connection to four subway lines: Namboku Line, Chiyoda Line, Ginza Line(220m) and Marunouchi Line(435m)

  • 3 mins by car from Kasumigaseki Exit of Shuto Expressway

  • 10 mins by car from Tokyo Station(435m)

Distance from hotel

About 10mins by Car

Akasaka Toyokawa Inari Temple Early flowering cherry blossoms and attendant foxes

Akasaka Toyokawa Inari Temple Early flowering cherry blossoms and attendant foxes

An early flowering cherry blossom, the Edo-higan (江戸彼岸), is in full bloom at Akasaka’s Toyokawa Inari today! Birds were playing around the pink flowers delightfully. This tree usually blooms around o-higan (March 21) in Tokyo. The enshrined deity here rides on a white fox, and followers of the temple believe that foxes are attendants of the deity. After the wishes of believers are fulfilled, they offer fox statues to the temple. There are large numbers of fox statues all around the precincts

Akasaka Excel Hotel Tokyu

chiyoda-ku

2-14-3, Nagata-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0014 

  • 1 minute on foot from Akasaka-mitsuke Station (Lines: Ginza and Marunouchi)

  • 1 minutes on foot from Nagatacho Station (Lines: Yurakucho, Hanzomon and Nanboku)

  • 10 minutes on the Marunouchi Line from Tokyo Station

Distance from hotel

about 5 minutes by walk from Akasaka Excel Hotel Tokyu

Sanno Matsuri Grand Parade A spectacular festival parade winding through Tokyo

Sanno Matsuri Grand Parade A spectacular festival parade winding through Tokyo

The Sanno Matsuri Grand Parade takes place every even numbered year in mid June. It is part of the Sanno Matsuri Festival which is one of the 3 most famous festivals in Tokyo. It occurs every other year, taking its turn with Kanda Matsuri which runs during odd numbered years in May. During the 11 day festival period there are many other smaller events on, which are advertised on a Japanese only website, but the main attraction is the grand parade.

The parade begins and ends at Hie Shrine (or Hie Jinja) near Akasaka. Hie Shrine is a very important shrine as it is believed to be the shrine responsible for the protection of Tokyo. The shrine is also associated with the Tokugawa family who ruled during the Edo period (1603-1867). They used this shrine festival to celebrate Edo becoming the new center of Japan. (Edo was the former name for Tokyo).

The parade has over 500 participants dressed in traditional costumes, playing drums and carrying floats decorated with animals. The most important part of the parade are the three mikoshi (portable shrines), which are carried along the festival route. The shrines are decorated with a phoenix on each roof. The parade is a colorful spectacle and many children, families and workers line the streets to watch the parade pass by.

The parade runs for nearly 20km and follows a path that leaves Hie Shrine at 7:45 a.m., tracks around Yotsuya Station at 8:45 a.m. and to Yasukuni Shrine by 10 a.m. There is a half hour stop at the Imperial Palace until 12:15 p.m. The parade then continues past Tokyo Station and has a one hour stop at Nihonbashi Hie Shrine from 1:30 p.m. until 2:30 p.m. The parade passes Ginza clock tower at approximately 3:15 p.m., Shimbashi Station at 4:30 p.m. and finally finishes by 5 p.m. back at Hie Shrine.

At Hie Shrine people line up to pass through the large straw ring that is set up during the festival. Passing through this ring is believed to purify you from all your sins of the last 6 months. There are also food stalls and vendors to help satisfy your appetite after a long walk through the city.

Closest train stations to Hie Shrine are Akasaka-mitsuke Station on the Ginza & Marunouchi lines or Tameike-sanno Station on the Ginza line or Kokkai-gijido-mae on the Chiyoda or Marunouchi lines.

Akasaka Excel Hotel Tokyu

chiyoda-ku

2-14-3, Nagata-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0014 

  • 1 minute on foot from Akasaka-mitsuke Station (Lines: Ginza and Marunouchi)

  • 1 minutes on foot from Nagatacho Station (Lines: Yurakucho, Hanzomon and Nanboku)

  • 10 minutes on the Marunouchi Line from Tokyo Station

Distance from hotel

about 8 minutes by walk from Akasaka Excel Hotel Tokyu

Shibuya Crossing The world's busiest crossing in Tokyo

Shibuya Crossing The world's busiest crossing in Tokyo

Besides Tokyo Tower there's another strong magnet pulling me to Tokyo. It is Shibuya Crossing. Shibuya is one of 23 city wards of Tokyo, packed with well-known brand stores, entertainment areas, and teenage districts. Shibuya Crossing itself is the most crowded place and it can be said it is the center of Shibuya.

Clearly, Shibuya Crossing is the busiest crossing in the world. There are at least 45,000 pedestrians every 30 minutes during rush hour. The world's busiest crossing is decorated by colorful neon at night. Here, you can find the famous Hachiko statue. It also is the setting of the Hollywood movie 'Lost in Translation' directed by Sofia Coppola in 2004. Enjoy crossing the busiest intersection in the world!

Cerulean Tower Tokyu Hotel

Shibuya

26-1 Sakuragaoka-cho, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8512 

  • 5 minutes on foot from Shibuya Station (Lines:JR, Tokyu Toyoko, Tokyu Denentoshi, Keio Inokashira, Ginza, Hanzomon, and Fukutoshin)

  • 25 minutes from Tokyo Station on the JR Yamanote line (outer track)

  • 45 minutes by train from Haneda Airport to Shibuya Station

Distance from hotel

about 8 minutes by walk from Cerulean Tower Tokyu Hotel

Shibuya Excel Hotel Tokyu

Shibuya

Shibuya Mark City Building, 1-12-2, Dogenzaka, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0043 

  • Direct access from Shibuya Station (Lines: JR, Tokyu Toyoko, Tokyu Denentosh, Ginza, Hanzomon, and Fukutoshin)

  • Above Shibuya Station on the Keio Inokashira Line

  • 40-60 minutes by car from Haneda Airport

Distance from hotel

about 3 minutes by walk from Shibuya Excel Hotel Tokyu

Shibuya Tokyu REI Hotel

Shibuya

1-24-10, Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0002 

  • JR Shibuya Station (2 minutes on foot form Miyamasuzaka Exit) served by the JR Line, Tokyu Toyoko Line,

  • Tokyu Den-en-toshi Line, Ginza Subway Line, Hanzomon sbuway Line, and Fukutoshin Subway Line

  • 85 minutes by car from Narita Airport

Distance from hotel

about 3 minutes by walk from Shibuya Tokyu REI Hotel

Meiji-Jingū Tokyo’s popular Shinto shrine

Meiji-Jingū Tokyo’s popular Shinto shrine

One of Tokyo’s most popular shrines is Meiji-Jingū, a Shinto shrine in the Harajuku area. Shinto is called Japan’s ancient original religion, with no identifiable founder or sacred text, and is based rather on the value of harmony with nature and the virtue of ‘Magokoro’, or sincere heart.

The Meiji Shrine is dedicated to the souls of Emperor Meiji (1852-1912) and his consort, Empress Shoken (1850-1914): both leaders who are held in high esteem to this day by the Japanese people. Emperor Meiji is considered one of the founders of modern Japan, due to the encouragement he offered to various modern industries and the support he showed for technological development, while still dedicating himself to preserving Japanese identity. Empress Shoken both supported the Emperor and devoted herself to promoting national welfare and women’s education.

The original shrine, completed in 1920, was destroyed in WWII. The current structure dates from 1958, and it is one of the most popular destinations for travelers to Tokyo.

Cerulean Tower Tokyu Hotel

Shibuya

26-1 Sakuragaoka-cho, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8512 

  • 5 minutes on foot from Shibuya Station (Lines:JR, Tokyu Toyoko, Tokyu Denentoshi, Keio Inokashira, Ginza, Hanzomon, and Fukutoshin)

  • 25 minutes from Tokyo Station on the JR Yamanote line (outer track)

  • 45 minutes by train from Haneda Airport to Shibuya Station

Distance from hotel

about 20 minutes by train from Cerulean Tower Tokyu Hotel

Shibuya Excel Hotel Tokyu

Shibuya

Shibuya Mark City Building, 1-12-2, Dogenzaka, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0043 

  • Direct access from Shibuya Station (Lines: JR, Tokyu Toyoko, Tokyu Denentosh, Ginza, Hanzomon, and Fukutoshin)

  • Above Shibuya Station on the Keio Inokashira Line

  • 40-60 minutes by car from Haneda Airport

Distance from hotel

about 20 minutes by train from Shibuya Excel Hotel Tokyu

Shibuya Tokyu REI Hotel

Shibuya

1-24-10, Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0002 

  • JR Shibuya Station (2 minutes on foot form Miyamasuzaka Exit) served by the JR Line, Tokyu Toyoko Line,

  • Tokyu Den-en-toshi Line, Ginza Subway Line, Hanzomon sbuway Line, and Fukutoshin Subway Line

  • 85 minutes by car from Narita Airport

Distance from hotel

about 20 minutes by train from Shibuya Tokyu REI Hotel

Shibuya Crossing The world's busiest crossing in Tokyo

Shibuya Crossing The world's busiest crossing in Tokyo

Besides Tokyo Tower there's another strong magnet pulling me to Tokyo. It is Shibuya Crossing. Shibuya is one of 23 city wards of Tokyo, packed with well-known brand stores, entertainment areas, and teenage districts. Shibuya Crossing itself is the most crowded place and it can be said it is the center of Shibuya.

Clearly, Shibuya Crossing is the busiest crossing in the world. There are at least 45,000 pedestrians every 30 minutes during rush hour. The world's busiest crossing is decorated by colorful neon at night. Here, you can find the famous Hachiko statue. It also is the setting of the Hollywood movie 'Lost in Translation' directed by Sofia Coppola in 2004. Enjoy crossing the busiest intersection in the world!

Meiji-Jingū Tokyo’s popular Shinto shrine

Meiji-Jingū Tokyo’s popular Shinto shrine

One of Tokyo’s most popular shrines is Meiji-Jingū, a Shinto shrine in the Harajuku area. Shinto is called Japan’s ancient original religion, with no identifiable founder or sacred text, and is based rather on the value of harmony with nature and the virtue of ‘Magokoro’, or sincere heart.

The Meiji Shrine is dedicated to the souls of Emperor Meiji (1852-1912) and his consort, Empress Shoken (1850-1914): both leaders who are held in high esteem to this day by the Japanese people. Emperor Meiji is considered one of the founders of modern Japan, due to the encouragement he offered to various modern industries and the support he showed for technological development, while still dedicating himself to preserving Japanese identity. Empress Shoken both supported the Emperor and devoted herself to promoting national welfare and women’s education.

The original shrine, completed in 1920, was destroyed in WWII. The current structure dates from 1958, and it is one of the most popular destinations for travelers to Tokyo.

Meiji-Jingū Tokyo’s popular Shinto shrine

Meiji-Jingū Tokyo’s popular Shinto shrine

One of Tokyo’s most popular shrines is Meiji-Jingū, a Shinto shrine in the Harajuku area. Shinto is called Japan’s ancient original religion, with no identifiable founder or sacred text, and is based rather on the value of harmony with nature and the virtue of ‘Magokoro’, or sincere heart. The Meiji Shrine is dedicated to the souls of Emperor Meiji (1852-1912) and his consort, Empress Shoken (1850-1914): both leaders who are held in high esteem to this day by the Japanese people. Emperor Meiji is considered one of the founders of modern Japan, due to the encouragement he offered to various modern industries and the support he showed for technological development, while still dedicating himself to preserving Japanese identity. Empress Shoken both supported the Emperor and devoted herself to promoting national welfare and women’s education. The original shrine, completed in 1920, was destroyed in WWII. The current structure dates from 1958, and it is one of the most popular destinations for travelers to Tokyo.

Shibuya Crossing The world's busiest crossing in Tokyo

Shibuya Crossing The world's busiest crossing in Tokyo

Besides Tokyo Tower there's another strong magnet pulling me to Tokyo. It is Shibuya Crossing. Shibuya is one of 23 city wards of Tokyo, packed with well-known brand stores, entertainment areas, and teenage districts. Shibuya Crossing itself is the most crowded place and it can be said it is the center of Shibuya. Clearly, Shibuya Crossing is the busiest crossing in the world. There are at least 45,000 pedestrians every 30 minutes during rush hour. The world's busiest crossing is decorated by colorful neon at night. Here, you can find the famous Hachiko statue. It also is the setting of the Hollywood movie 'Lost in Translation' directed by Sofia Coppola in 2004. Enjoy crossing the busiest intersection in the world!

Meiji-Jingū Tokyo’s popular Shinto shrine